Top 5: Olympus BioScapes Competition 2013


1- Siwanowicz

1st Place
Dr. Igor Siwanowicz
Specimen: Open trap of aquatic carnivorous plant, humped bladderwort Utricularia gibba, with single-cell organisms inside.
Technique: Confocal imaging, 100x

Much like Nikon’s Photomicrography Competiton aims to promote Nikon’s products the newer Olympus BioScapes Competition is an advertisement for Olympus. Again the competition is judged by scientists, this Top 5 gives an alternate arts oriented view.

5

Mr. Laurie Knight Maidstone, Kent, United Kingdom Specimen: European hornet. Technique: Epi-illumination

Honourable Mention
Mr. Laurie Knight
Specimen: European hornet.
Technique: Epi-illumination

I star with two entries from Laurie Knight of Kent, UK which go well together, two insect profiles. The naturally contrasting yellow and black of the hornet and stunning detail match the brilliant iridescent fly eyes and it’s hard to choose between them.

Mr. Laurie Knight Maidstone, Kent, United Kingdom Specimen: Long-legged fly. Technique: Epi-illumination

Honourable Mention
Mr. Laurie Knight Maidstone
Specimen: Long-legged fly.
Technique: Epi-illumination

4

Honourable Mention Mr. Charles Krebs Specimen: Chrysochroa buqueti. This detail of the carapace behind the jewel beetle's eye shows thethe iridescent color pattern created by the surface. Technique: Diffused reflected illumination, 200x

Honourable Mention
Mr. Charles Krebs
Specimen: Chrysochroa buqueti. This detail of the carapace behind the jewel beetle’s eye shows thethe iridescent color pattern created by the surface.
Technique: Diffused reflected illumination, 200x

Continuing the theme of iridescence Charles Krebs reveals the texture behind the eye-catching effect in far more detail.

3

Dr. Matthew S. Lehnert and Ms. Catherine P. Mulvane Kent State University at Stark North Canton, Ohio, United States Specimen: Tip of the proboscis of a Viceroy butterfly. The protruding structures are chemosensilla used for tasting sugary fluids. Technique: Confocal imaging, 20x

Honourable Mention
Dr. Matthew S. Lehnert and Ms. Catherine P. Mulvane
Specimen: Tip of the proboscis of a Viceroy butterfly. The protruding structures are chemosensilla used for tasting sugary fluids.
Technique: Confocal imaging, 20x

What is the equivalent mouth and nose for a butterfly is shown here in an image by Matthew Lehnert and Catherine Mulvane.

2

Honourable Mention Mr. Jens Petersen Specimen: Hairy filament and closed anther of a flower of Verbascum nigrum (dark mullein). Technique: Reflected light

Honourable Mention
Mr. Jens Petersen
Specimen: Hairy filament and closed anther of a flower of Verbascum nigrum (dark mullein).
Technique: Reflected light

I like this image by Jens Petersen because, thanks to the greens in the background, it looks like the specimen was still outside in it’s natural habitat. As well as leading the veiwer to imagine the flower surrounded by grass and trees the green combines with the lilac and vivid orange to create an impressionable palette.

1

3rd Place Dr. Igor Siwanowicz Specimen: Single-cell fresh water algae (desmids). Composite image including, concentric from the outside: Micrasterias rotata, Micrasterias sp., M. furcata, M. americana, 2x M. truncata, Euastrum sp. and Cosmarium sp. Technique: Confocal imaging, 400x

3rd Place
Dr. Igor Siwanowicz
Specimen: Single-cell fresh water algae (desmids). Composite image including, concentric from the outside: Micrasterias rotata, Micrasterias sp., M. furcata, M. americana, 2x M. truncata, Euastrum sp. and Cosmarium sp.
Technique: Confocal imaging, 400x

There’s something enchanting about the symmetry of this algae. Igor Siwanowicz, who also won first place (Top), has applied what again is, like Petersens’ dark mullein, a fascinating palette. This time it would have been applied post imaging on the computer and so in addition to the natural beauty Igor has added something of his own to the image.

You can see the other entries here. You can follow me here on WordPress or on Facebook.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s