Top 5: Sculpture by the Sea 2013


Sculpture by the Sea is an art exhibition that this year has graced the shores of Bondi (Australia), Cotesloe (Australia) and Aarhus (Denmark). In this Top 5 I have chosen my favourite from across all three exhibitions.

The Great thing about outdoor exhibitions is that artists get to work with the landscape and play with it in a way they couldn’t in a conventional gallery.

5

'folded 3' Andrew Rogers Bondi, Australia

‘folded 3’
Andrew Rogers
Bondi, Australia

Andrew Rogers folds a sheet of copper to reveal both sides at once, one shiny and new, one aged, but still vivid in appearance, the green striking in contrast with the newer copper.

4

Toshio Lezumi

‘m.130301.2’
Toshio Lezumi
Cotesloe, Australia

I think the placement of Toshio Lezumi’s unimaginatively named ‘m.130301.2’ does an otherwise generic glass sculpture many favours. Australia’s sunny weather also helped to illuminate the rods in their green backdrop.

3

'Once' James Dive (The Glue Society) Cotesloe

‘Once’
James Dive (The Glue Society)
Cotesloe

The Glue Society’s James Dive packed the remains of an old fun fair into at 13 foot cube. By it’s nature all the elements are bright colours and make for an interesting sculpture with a history.

2

Alejandro-Propato---Permanent-Sunrise---Alejandro-Propato-10

sculpture at the sea 030 permanent sunrise ‘Permanent Sunrise’
Alejandro Propato
Aarhus, Denmark

 The horizon at Aarhus’s beech was, from the right angle, given a permanent photogenic tint with Alejandro Propato’s threaded sculpture.

1

46_David_McCracken_diminishandascend_SxSBondi2013_Clyde_Yee

'Diminish and Ascend' David McCracken Bondi, Australia

‘Diminish and Ascend’
David McCracken
Bondi, Australia

The top spot goes to David McCracken‘s clever use of perspective to convince us that the stairs climb on indefinitely. Of course, he has not really built an infinite staircase but relies on a trick Escher would be proud of. Each step is slightly smaller than the last so that the top of the sculpture becomes a point. This is what we expect to see from a set of parallel lines, like train tracks going off into the distance. The subtlety tricks us into believing there is no end.

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